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Showing posts matching tag: Fantasy

                          

The Girl in the Tower

By Katherine Arden, An impressive second installment in Arden's Winternight trilogy

I’ve been meaning to read the second book in Katherine Arden’s delightful Winternight Trilogy pretty much ever since I read the first book. Well, actually the plan was to read the second book before the third one came out (which was released earlier this year in January), but obviously that did not happen. Anyway, I …

                          

The Bear and the Nightingale

By Katherine Arden, A distinctive and enchanting book based in Russian folklore

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden is one of those books that not everyone seems to know about, but everyone who’s read it seems to love it. It’s a novel based in Russian folk tales, history and culture, and it’s the first book of her Winternight trilogy. The second book is The Girl …

              

Spinning Silver

By Naomi Novik, A compelling and imaginative retelling of Rumpelstiltskin

Naomi Novik’s newest novel, Spinning Silver, is a loose retelling of the Brother’s Grimm version of Rumplestiltskin — it borrows just enough elements from it to be recognizable while spending most of its time spinning a vivid and original tale. Plot Summary Miryem lives in a small town in the kingdom of Lithvas and comes …

                    

Uprooted

By Naomi Novik, A flawed but fun high fantasy novel

I’d heard about the many, many fans of Naomi Novik’s Uprooted a while back, but hadn’t planned on getting it since it belongs firmly in the fantasy genre — not really the typical literary fiction stuff I usually go for. But I was in the mood for something different and easy, so I picked it …

                 

Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell

By Susanna Clarke, An Alternate History of Two Magicians During the Napoleonic Wars

I finally finished Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke, which I really enjoyed. It’s about two magicians, set in England during the Napoleonic Wars. When the story begins, magicians are almost an anachronistic remnant of Britain’s past (according to the story, magic once abounded but has since disappeared). Instead, there are only theoretical …