Tag Archives

Showing reviews matching tag: Historical Fiction

                 

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay

By Michael Chabon, A story about the rise of the modern comic book hero and its role as a Social Justice Warrior in pre-WWII America

There’s been chatter lately from certain outlets about how comic books are being ruined by social justice warriors (or “SJW”s for short) who are making these stories too “political”. It’s ironic for a number of reasons — one of which is that the modern day superhero has a storied history of being a social justice …

                    

The Orphan Master’s Son

By Adam Johnson, A Powerful Tale of Survival and Life in North Korea

“But people do things to survive, and then after they survive, they can’t live with what they’ve done.” So, this is going to be a little lengthy, especially because I ended up reading up a fair amount on North Korea after I finished the book. I’ll split it into parts though to make it a …

                       

My Name Is Red

By Orhan Pamuk, A Philosophical Art Mystery

Huh. I liked this book in theory. My Name is Red reads like a philosophical mystery, except it’s only about art philosophy. It’s a story about a murder among a group of miniaturists (which are basically artists), and it is set in the Ottoman Empire. The book itself was originally written in Turkish. The idea …

           

The Poisonwood Bible

By Barbara Kingsolver, A Well-Written Story of A Missionary Family in the Congo

I promised, like three years ago, to Jessie that I would read something by Barbara Kingsolver, who she says is one of her favorite writers. So, true to my (procrastinating) word, I finally got around to and finished The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver earlier today. I’ve been trying to mix it up in my …

                 

A Conspiracy of Paper

By David Liss, Not A Lot Of Substance But A Faced-Paced Historical Mystery

I finished A Conspiracy of Paper by David Liss a while ago and still haven’t been able to decide whether or not I liked it. It’s basically about the prelude to the first financial bubble in London, which is where the stock markets first began to develop back in the early 18th century. As a …